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Jan 242018
 

Organization: Plan International
Country: Ghana
Closing date: 11 Feb 2018

The Organisation

Plan International is evolving in response to shifts in international development and humanitarian response. We are doing this so we can continue to make a stand for children’s rights.

Having identified girls as the most marginalised group, they will be our ongoing focus as we work towards helping 100 million girls learn, lead, decide and thrive within their communities.

Plan International started its operations in Ghana in 1992 and has grown to work in over 600 communities in eight Regions of the country, with programs units in Upper West, Central, Eastern and Volta Regions and one support office in the Northern region.

The main focus of Plan’s programs in Ghana has been to work alongside children, youth and their communities to address the structural and root causes of poverty, inequality and exclusion.

The Opportunity

As a Country Director, you will lead Plan Internationals presence in country, including legal representation along with responsibility to develop and evolve the strategic ambition and to plan, lead and direct all associated projects and programmes in country.

In order to fulfil Plan International’s mission of promoting girls’ rights, you will lead by example in ensuring gender equality is evident in everything we do from staffing, to programing to ways of working. You will work with your team to bring about the right culture that ensures we are champions for girls and gender equality.

You will be expected to develop strategies at country level that align with Plan Internationals global purpose and strategy within the prevailing context of that country, ensuring maximum impact for children.

You will lead a motivated and high-performing team and ensure legal compliance, implementing a well-funded programme, ready and able to respond to emergency and development needs of the most marginalised children.

Do you have what it takes?

In order to succeed in this varied and challenging role you will need:

Proven experience of exercising leadership functions with increasing responsibility in an international environment related to development.

Strong diplomatic, and communication skills, including through mass-media in order to influence decision-makers and key stakeholders.

Proven understanding of “child rights” and “gender in development” concepts and the promotion of girls’ rights in the context of relevant International Conventions (Convention of the Rights of the Child, Convention for the Eradication of Discrimination against Women) and the Global Goals (SDGs).

Knowledge of the requirements of donor compliance and financial management

Knowledge of programming in challenging environments with good understanding and appreciation of the historical, security context, political environment, economic, social/religious and humanitarian context in Ghana or a comparable environment.

Excellent English and French – written and verbal communication skills.

Our organisational values are designed to help everyone who works with us achieve our ambitious goals for children, especially girls.

  • We are open and accountable
  • We strive for lasting impact
  • We work well together
  • We are inclusive and empowering

Type of Role: 3 year Fixed Term Contract

Location: Accra, Ghana

Salary: Circa $85,000.00 USD per annum plus benefits

Reports to: Sub-Regional Director

Closing Date: Sunday 11th February 2018

Early application is encouraged as we will review applications throughout the advertising period and reserve the right to close the advert early.

Please note that only applications and CVs written in English will be accepted.

A range of pre-employment checks will be undertaken in conformity with Plan International’s Child Protection Policy.

As an international child centred community development organisation, Plan International is fully committed to promoting the realisation of children’s rights including their right to protection from violence and abuse. That means we have particular responsibilities to children that we come into contact with.

Plan International believes that in a world where children face so many threats of harm, it is our duty to ensure that we, as an organisation, do everything we can to keep children safe. We must not contribute in any way to harming or placing children at risk.

Plan International operates an equal opportunities policy and actively encourages diversity, welcoming applications from all areas of the international community.

How to apply:

https://career5.successfactors.eu/sfcareer/jobreqcareer?jobId=25527&company=PlanInt&username=

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